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10 Sizzling Ways to Make a Feature of Your Cooker Splashback

Enhance your kitchen with these creative ways to beautify the wall behind your hob

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The wall behind your cooker needs to be protective and practical, but that doesn’t mean it can’t look fabulous, too. In fact, a splashback offers the perfect opportunity to get really creative. Check out these ideas for inspiration.

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Fill up with metro tiles
There’s no splashback as such here, as the whole wall is tiled, but the expanse of white metro tiles and contrasting dark grout provides protection while making the area look bright and generous. The whole space is as one and not broken up, as it would be with a small splashback.

A wide tiled area like this makes the kitchen workspace very practical, as splashes from any area can simply be wiped away. The grey grout is a good choice, as it won’t get stained as fast as white would. It’s a good option, too, if you don’t want to draw your eye to your cooker and could help to make a smaller room appear bigger.

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Give it star billing
In this plain white kitchen, the huge piece of marble behind the hob is the centrepiece. By keeping everything else in the room white, the eye is immediately drawn to this decorative expanse, and the watery veining adds a softness to the straight lines of the units.

As it reaches from the work surface to the ceiling and across the span almost without a join, the finish looks expensive without being showy. The natural beauty is allowed to shine and gives the room elegance and personality.

Explore more ways to use marble in your home

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Big up brick or stone
If you’re lucky enough to have a beautiful exposed masonry wall, you probably won’t want to cover it up. You will need to protect it, though, as the brick or stone will be porous and any oily or coloured splashes will sink in and be tricky to remove. A large piece of heat-resistant glass will allow the masonry to show through, and the glass can be given a quick wipe down to keep it looking good.

The glass here is attached to the cooker as a lid, but you could achieve the same look by fixing a sheet of glass to the wall.

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Divert the work surface
For a sleek, coordinated look, consider carrying your work surface up the wall to form a splashback. This will give a visual flow up and over the cooker with nothing else to disturb the eye.

It’s best to choose this option at the time of buying a new worktop – ask the suppliers to create a splashback to your chosen size when they’re cutting it. They can fit it all at the same time so the joins are seamless and the finish beautifully tailored.

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Map the area
This simple kitchen serves as the perfect blank canvas against which the lovely map splashback can shine. The black-and-white design keeps the colours in the room crisp and simple; a coloured version would give a softer, more vintage feel.

Numerous companies can create a bespoke map splashback for you, so search online.

Check out these unusual ways to decorate with maps

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Add glitz with antiqued mirror glass
A grid of nine antiqued mirror panels is a lovely contrast to the sleek modernity of the stainless steel cooker below. This type of glass is treated to give the antiqued look and the patches of colour also disguise splashes.

The style here is perfect for adding interest to a plain kitchen without introducing colour. It’s understated yet eye-catching. You’ll need a specialist company to provide the glass, as they will ensure it’s tough and heatproof.

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Showcase eye-catching fabric
This homeowner has turned the space behind the cooker into a cheerful accent with a favourite length of fabric. It’s a great way to have an individual piece of art in your kitchen.

Specialist firms can fuse fabric between two layers of heat-resistant glass to create your own individual version. Hunt online for various suppliers to find out what can be achieved.

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Introduce colour and pattern
The area behind the hob offers a good opportunity to be creative with pattern without it overpowering the whole room. These tiles have a vintage finish, with mottled colour in muted tones. They have a softness in the design that’s a good balance to the chalky palette on the units and wall. It’s an easy-to-live-in space that still has lots of character.

When choosing tiles for your own version of this, ask the store to check they will work behind a hob and buy several different designs as samples. Take them home and prop them up in the room to help you choose which looks best in your setting.

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Be anything but square
In this kitchen, it’s all about the cooker. The bright yellow range is a cheerful centrepiece, surrounded by rich blue units. The back stone wall is another feature, but while the temptation could have been to install a very plain splashback, the owners have had a piece of stainless steel cut into a map of France.

It doesn’t shout its presence as much as the cooker, but the unusual shape means it holds its own in this bold kitchen.

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Brave a strong shade
This kitchen shows another way to introduce the same hit of bright colour that’s often achieved with bespoke glass. These simple red glazed tiles have been laid in a brick formation to cover the cooker splashback area, as well as the space on either side.

Ceramic tiles are easy to cut and fit yourself in a way that glass isn’t, so this is a perfect option if you want the intensity of colour without the hefty price tag.

What do you think of these cooker splashbacks? Are you a fan of glass, tiles or something more bespoke? Share your thoughts in the Comments below.
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